Tips for Your Next Logo Redesign [Infographic]

Logo redesigns are a huge risk. You wouldn’t think so – after all, you have an advantage because you’re working with a proven design. But that’s kind of the problem. How do you improve a design that already works? And how do you convince customers to ditch a design they love for one that’s unfamiliar?

Many designers update an old logo, only to watch customers completely reject it. When big-name brand Gap introduced a new logo in 2010, it was met with such hatred that the company returned to its old logo within a week.

Gap Logo: Old and New

So how do you avoid a Gap-level fiasco? Start by looking at the old design. Determine what customers like about it – maybe the color, the shape, or some intangible quality like coolness or sophistication. You may even want to consider asking your customers to tell you what they like.

While you’re at it, find out what they don’t like. Maybe the font is hard to read, or the symbol looks like one object when it’s really supposed to look like something else. Take Bacardi’s logo – the symbol has always been a bat, but it’s definitely more bat-like following the company’s recent redesign.

Bacardi Logo Redesign

Once you start actually working on the redesign, it’s important to consider why you’re making each change. If the reason is “because I can,” stop. Your job is to improve a logo, not make it unrecognizable.

But sometimes, it can be hard to tell when a change is a real improvement or just a matter of personal preference. This logo redesign infographic from Company Folders will help you understand the difference. It walks through the seven steps of logo redesign—including how to revive an old idea, focus on the right colors, and embrace new trends.

Most Successful Logo Redesigns of the Past Few Years Infographic

Want to read more about logo design? Check out these past posts on Design Roast:

Choosing a Color Scheme for Your Nonprofit’s LogoChoosing a Color Scheme for Your Nonprofit’s Logo

The Recipe for a Perfect Logo [Infographic]The Recipe for a Perfect Logo

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