The colors you choose for your site reflect on your brand’s overall message and personality. Different colors evoke different emotions in the user, so figuring out what shades to use is important. Coming up with color palette ideas isn’t easy. Not only is color choice important, but the colors you choose must complement one another and create a visually pleasing effect.

Around 42 percent of shoppers immediately form an opinion on a website based on the overall design, including the colors. Color impacts mood and even the decision to buy a product. The topic is important enough that researchers study the impact of different colors on different genders. If you’re convinced about how important your color scheme is, consider the following eight color palette ideas when choosing your design.

1. Go With Beautiful Blues

Blue is a fairly safe color choice for web design, as it is a reliable and trustworthy color. The impact blue has on the average person is likely why so many financial institutions use the color blue in their designs. Experts believe blue is the safest color scheme for businesses to use. People love blue overwhelmingly, at 57 percent of men and 35 percent of women. Think about some of the big online players who use blue, such as Facebook and Twitter. Choose blue if you need to instill trust in your brand or appeal to the widest base for both sexes.

2. Gain Inspiration From Palette Generators

You may already have a color scheme for your company, but you aren’t quite sure what colors pair well with your logo. One easy way to find color palette ideas is to plug in the primary color of your logo to an online palette wizard and see what choices come up. Most wizards allow you to move around choices and swap in different shades until you find the palette you love.

Colors on the Web offers the option to plug in a color code and get ideas about what colors go best with that specific shade. Paletton is a well-known color palette ideas generator. Paletton is a bit more advanced, as you can choose a single color, multiple colors, adjacent colors, complementary colors and even a tetrad (four colors).

3. Know What Colors to Avoid

Some colors should only be used in moderation, if at all. For example, colors used to show caution, such as the orange used in construction cones or the yellow used at a stop light, may signal to the user’s brain to proceed with caution. In one study, women said they didn’t like the color orange, and 26 percent of them felt the color was “cheap.”

4. Find Green Color Palette Ideas

Green is the easiest color for people to process. It signals growth and is used for natural products or sometimes money matters. Most people feel fairly neutral about the color green. It isn’t widely hated, but it isn’t universally loved either. If you need to put the focus more on your content than your design, you can implement a green color scheme to keep the focus on the content.

5. Understand Your Brand’s Personality

Your color palette needs to reflect your brand’s overall personality and message. Remember, every color evokes some type of emotion in the viewer. If you run an eCommerce website that offers fun and young clothing, then you’re not going to use a navy blue color scheme that is serious and old looking. Instead, you’ll go for brighter colors that elicit excitement in the viewer.

6. Consider Contrast

The way the colors in your palette contrast with one another is important. Your palette needs not only colors that mesh well together, but you need a variety of shades for the different elements on your page. For example, if your background is dark, you need a lighter color for your text. If your background is light, you need a very dark color for your text. The result should be text that isn’t harsh on the eyes. If you’re not sure, do some testing and get feedback on the contrast and how easy your page is to read.

7. Use the Isolation Effect

Choose one color in your palette that highlights only the most important information. Saving a color choice for only specific elements draws the user’s eye because it isn’t used often and is something different. The isolation effect shows that the human brain processes anything a bit different and gives it importance. If you want to highlight a call to action button, then you would make that button a color that isn’t used elsewhere on the page but still complements the overall palette.

8. Study Award Winners

Still not sure about what color palette you should use? Take the time to study award-winning sites. Some awards focus on specific elements, such as the color scheme. For example, you can study 50 award-winning websites and their color schemes to see what works and what doesn’t. Awwwards.com offers several awards for various design elements, and they announce new winners on a regular basis.

Another way to figure out how colors work together is to study some of your favorite sites. Upon landing on a site, most of our response to that site is based on the visual aspects. Which sites do you love visiting? Take the time to study how they integrate different colors into their design. What is their overall color scheme, and what can you learn from it? Gain color palette ideas from other sites, then put your own creative twist on a palette that belongs to you alone.

 

Choose a Color Palette

The colors you choose have an impact on your site visitors and can mean the difference between a good conversion rate and a lousy one. If something isn’t working, don’t be afraid to tweak your colors and try something new. Conduct A/B testing to see which colors get the best response from your site visitors.

You don’t have to be a top artist to choose a color scheme that works. You do, however, have to pay attention to detail and be willing to experiment with different combinations.

 

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About the author

Lexie Lu

Hello! My name is Lexie and I have a fervor for design, writing, and coffee. I graduated with a dual major in Creative Writing and Commercial Design, and through those grueling study hours (facilitated by coffee, of course) I always found time to write for myself.

My posts feature design trends throughout all industries and show how the field is always changing. There’s never a dull moment in the design world!

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