Making the user experience (UX) the absolute best it can be is a goal of designers everywhere. Not only does UX matter for websites, but also for mobile apps and any other type of interaction a consumer has with technology.

About 52 percent of users indicate that a bad experience on mobile makes them less likely to bother with a company at all. UX design matters, and some of the top apps of 2018 can teach us about the best UX elements to include in overall design.

Below are eight mobile apps that people are downloading and using in droves. Each has a focus on the user that helps the app be successful.

1. Matt Hancock

It is vital that you thoroughly test your app before releasing it to the general public. One way to learn about good UX design is to study bad UX design. One example is UK politician Matt Hancock’s app. His app had functional errors and privacy issues, among other problems. The backlash from the media and the public was almost instant.

What you can learn from this app’s mistake is to make sure everything functions as it should before releasing a UX design. Test, test and test again.

2. HQ Trivia

This trivia-based app has continued to grow in popularity, regularly seeing over one million users for each game. A standard game goes through 10 trivia questions, each one growing more difficult than the previous. In the end, those who’ve answered all the questions correctly split the prize.

HQ Trivia does something that works well from a user standpoint in that it features a live video of a game host. This host quickly explains the rules for any newbies and explains clearly how to choose an answer and move through the game.

3. VMWare Boxer

VMWare Boxer is a mobile app that serves as an iPhone email client. It integrates with your calendar, automatically scheduling appointments and allowing you to double check meeting days and times almost seamlessly. You can bulk select faster than with nearly any other email app, which saves the user time and effort.

Easy swipes allow you to do everything from delete emails to oversee calendars. Also, the user can dial into a meeting from the app itself. The UX of this app’s design is among the many time-saving features for the user.

4. Coinbase

Coinbase allows users to manage digital currency in one convenient location. Even with a digital currency, however, people need to feel that they can trust the app to not lose their funds. The use of the color blue is one that many banks use, and thus the app looks official and evokes a sense of trust.

Different colors create different emotions in people. Blue evokes security and trust, so utilizing those colors in the app is a smart move. The app is available both for Android and iOS.

5. Shine

Shine takes a motivational app and adds intense levels of personalization. Personalizing the user experience is one way to positively engage the user. Not only does the app send you a daily text to inspire you, but it will send you personalized quotes, articles and gives ideas to start each day positively.

Even though Shine doesn’t require a download from the app store, it is worth mentioning here because designers can learn a lot from the personalized features. Shine also offers a VIP club for 10 referrals of others to the program. Shine does offer an iOS download if you’d like the ability to pull up articles and advice at any time, not just when receiving a text.

6. Nike Training Club

Nike Training Club is an app that motivates people to get fit. One of the key UX features of this app that one can learn from is the use of celebrity trainers and athletes to offer motivation and inspiration to users. The app is available for both Android and iOS devices.

A few of the more user-friendly features include short videos that take just over live minutes to watch, images showing how to perform the exercises and more than 160 free workouts for a variety of fitness levels.

7. Splitwise

Splitwise is an app that easily solves a problem. If you’ve ever been out to dinner with friends, then you’re aware that some restaurants don’t like to split the bill up 10 different ways. However, you can easily have one person earn the points on his credit card while everyone else sends him their portion of the bill with the Splitwise app.

The app is user-friendly because it does all the calculations for you, either splitting evenly or by items. If someone fails to pay, the app sends an email reminder. They also calculate a percentage of costs, such as a portion of rent or other expense.

8. Basecamp

Basecamp is a task app that is super easy to use. The choices are a bit more limited than on the desktop version, but the user can easily navigate with a simple touch on the mobile device screen. Basecamp offers more than one version but will notify you if the version you download is not compatible with the version your employer uses online.

Some of the key features that make the Basecamp app user-friendly include notifications that are easy to find and read through. Once read, the notification message disappears. Also, to-dos are easily checked off and shown as completed on the user’s screen.

Top Apps and UX Design

Today’s top apps teach designers a lot about UX design and things that make life easier for the end user. Studying these apps allows designers not only to learn how best to create an app, but also the types of elements users most want in their technology. Whether you’re designing a website or a new app, you can apply these principles in a way that your users will appreciate.

 

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About the author

Lexie Lu

Hello! My name is Lexie and I have a fervor for design, writing, and coffee. I graduated with a dual major in Creative Writing and Commercial Design, and through those grueling study hours (facilitated by coffee, of course) I always found time to write for myself.

My posts feature design trends throughout all industries and show how the field is always changing. There’s never a dull moment in the design world!

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